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Endeavor. always.

EVERYONE HAS THE SAME TWO CHOICES: STOP OR KEEP GOING.


We're on a mission to win gold medals at the 2016 Summer Olympics. When things are tough, when there’s no end in sight, when we want to quit, when people tell us we can’t, when we tell ourselves we can't, when we’ve improved, when we’re record-chasers, when we’re record-breakers, when we don’t make the podium, when we’re on top of the podium; we always choose to keep going. We hope you do too.

Elite living

 

Meet The Eatons

We are Ashton and Brianne. We are a married couple from two different countries. We are total tech and reality TV junkies. We are small-town grower-uppers, adventure seekers and nutritious eaters. We are world travelers and competition dabblers. We are hard-workers and play-harders; dreamers, achievers, avid readers and coffee-needers. We are athletes. We are people. This is who we are. 

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Ashton

Ashton grew up in a small, mostly dirt-filled town in Oregon named La Pine. Later he moved to a slightly bigger town named Bend. It was in these places that he learned about hard work and how to use his imagination. He also discovered he loved movement. 

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Brianne

Brianne was an ultra-competitive young girl growing up in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada. Her parents—not knowing what to do with her—enrolled Brianne in every sport they could think of. She thrived on the adrenaline of competition and being the best at everything she did. 

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WHAT WE DO

Track and field has three event categories: running, jumping, and throwing. Each of these categories has many event types. For example, 100m sprint, high jump, or hammer throw. Usually an athlete specializes in one event type, like the high jump, maximizing their output in that area. But, there are two events in track and field unlike all the others. They combine events from all three categories: they are the heptathlon and decathlon. That's what we do.


Track and field has three event categories: running, jumping, and throwing. Each of these categories has many event types. For example, 100m sprint, high jump, or hammer throw. Usually an athlete specializes in one event type, like the high jump, maximizing their output in that area. But, there are two events in track and field unlike all the others. They combine events from all three categories: they are the heptathlon and decathlon.

That's what we do.
1

100 METER HURDLES

Being the first event of seven, athletes are nervous and anxious to start the two-day competition. The hurdles are a test of speed and skill. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks for 100 meters, running over 10 barriers that are 33 inches (2.75ft) high.


Brianne's Best: 12.98 sec.
Worth: 1127 points

2

HIGH JUMP

After the hurdles, athletes are energized, more relaxed, and into the rhythm of competition. The high jump is about being smooth and rhythmical in the approach while being dynamic at take off. An athlete chooses their starting height. The bar is raised in 3cm increments. Once an athlete fails three times at a height, they are finished with the high jump competition and given credit for the previous height they cleared.


Brianne's Best: 1.89m (6'2”)
Worth: 1093 points

3

SHOT PUT

The first two events are explosive, powerful, and demanding on your legs. In this event athletes must ask their legs for the same things again, now with extra weight. The women's “shot” is a 4kg (8.8lb.) steel ball. Lower body strength and overall technique are the key to this event. In the heptathlon, each athlete gets three throws.


Brianne's Best: 13.79m
Worth: 780 points

4

200 M

By the time we get to the 200m, the fourth and final event of day one, athletes are thoroughly fatigued, as it's been a long day of competition (sometimes up to 10 hours). The 200m requires athletes to use speed and endurance to sprint halfway around the track.


Brianne's Best: 23.34 sec.
Worth: 1045 points

5

LONG JUMP

The second day of competition is what makes a heptathlete. When athletes arrive on the morning of day two, they are usually sore and achy from the previous day. Operating on little sleep, the women ask their bodies to be dynamic again. The long jump is about gradually picking up speed down the runway and transferring that speed through the take-off board, in the air, and into a sand pit. Each athlete gets three attempts.


Brianne's Best: 6.72m
Worth: 1079 points

6

JAVELIN

Leading into the javelin, athletes begin to see the light at the end of the competition. The javelin is so light it's weighed in grams (600g), so it's hard to not try and throw it as hard as you can with your arm. Like the high jump and long jump, it's about a smooth, rhythmical approach down the runway and, as with shot put, using your lower body to throw the javelin. An athlete gets three attempts.


Brianne's Best: 46.43m
Worth: 791 points

7

800 M

By this point, every heptathlete just wants to be done. Their bodies are tired and sore. The 800 meters is the event that has been sitting in the back of each athlete's mind for two days, causing knots in their stomachs. They start the two-lap run from a standing position, and the race is all about endurance and guts.


Brianne's Best: 2:09.02 sec.
Worth: 979 points

BRIANNE'S BEST TOTAL SCORE
6808
DAY 1 EVENTS
DAY 2 EVENTS
  • 1100 M

    Because this is the first event of ten, athletes are nervous and anxious to start the two-day competition. The 100m race is a test of maximum physical speed. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks and cover the distance as fast as they can.

    Ashton's Best: 10.21 sec
    Worth: 1044 points

  • 2LONG JUMP

    After the nerves have settled down from sprinting on the track, athletes head to the field. The long jump is about gradually picking up speed down the runway and transferring that speed through the take-off, in the air, and into a sand pit. Each athlete gets three attempts.

    Ashton's Best: 8.23m
    Worth: 1120 points

  • 3SHOT PUT

    The first two events are explosive, powerful, and demanding on your legs. Athletes in this event must ask their bodies for the same things again, now with extra weight. The men's “shot” is a 7.25kg (16lb) steel ball. Lower body power and overall technique are the key to doing well in this event. Each athlete gets three throws.

    Ashton's Best: 15.00m
    Worth: 790 points

  • 4HIGH JUMP

    As fatigue starts to set in, athletes now move to one of the longest events of the competition. The high jump is about being smooth and rhythmical in the approach while being dynamic at take off. An athlete chooses their starting height. The bar is raised in 3cm increments. Once an athlete fails three times at a height, they are finished with the high jump competition and given credit for the previous height they cleared.

    Ashton's Best: 2.10m (6'10.7'')
    Worth: 896 points

  • 5400 M

    By the time we get to the 400m, the final event of day one, athletes are thoroughly fatigued, as it's been a long day of competition (sometimes up to 12 hours). Athletes complete the one lap as fast as they can—an exhausting test of speed endurance.

    Ashton's Best: 46.02 sec
    Worth: 1007 points

  • 6110 Meter Hurdles

    The second day of competition is what makes a decathlete. When athletes arrive on the morning of day two, they are usually sore and achy from the previous day. Operating on little sleep, the men ask their bodies to be dynamic again. The hurdles are a test of speed and skill. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks for 110 meters, running over 10 barriers that are 42 inches (3.5 feet) high.

    Ashton's Best: 13.52 sec
    Worth: 1037 points

  • 7DISCUS

    Having woken up from the starting gun of the hurdles, athletes move to the field again. Lighter than the shot put, the 2.2kg (4.85lbs) disc is like a steel pancake. Decathletes have to battle fatigued legs while spinning in a ring and releasing the spinning disc into the sector. Each athlete gets three throws.

    Ashton's Best: 46.17m
    Worth: 791 points

SCORING

The events in the heptathlon and decathlon are always contested in the same order. Events are scored according to a time or distance—not placement; an athlete can get 3rd in one event and 2nd in another and still be the leader overall. Each event has a set point amount for every time or distance. The points are displayed in the “heptathlon/decathlon scoring table.” At the end of the competition the scores are added together for an overall score, which determines the winner of the heptathlon and decathlon.

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