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Endeavor. always.

EVERYONE HAS THE SAME TWO CHOICES: STOP OR KEEP GOING.


We were on a mission to win gold medals at the 2016 Summer Olympics. We got bronze and gold. When things got tough, when there was no end in sight, when we wanted to quit, when people told us we couldn't, when we told ourselves we couldn't, when we improved, when we were record-chasers, when we were record-breakers, when we didn't make the podium, when we were trying to get on top of the podium; we always chose to keep going. We hope you did too.

 

 Now we have retired from track & field.

Our Valedictory

 

 

BRianne

 

It never fails. Before every 800m race, I’m in a panic. “Why do I do this? This isn’t fun. I’m scared and stressed out. I can’t do this anymore. I’m retiring.” Then I cross the finish line, am surrounded by my competitors who instantly bring water, high fives, hugs and congratulate me on getting through another heptathlon, no matter the result. It’s then that I remember why I do the heptathlon. The adrenaline, the thrill of competition and the opportunity to compete against a group of very talented women who make me a better athlete. I instantly get excited for my next heptathlon.

But crossing the 800m finish line in Rio I didn’t have this feeling. I was mentally exhausted. I have never been so thankful to be finished something in my life. I felt like I never wanted to do another heptathlon again. This feeling confused me.

I took 3 months to completely get away. I didn’t think about those feelings. I didn’t want to make any decisions based on my mental exhaustion. But as the start of the 2017 season drew nearer, I felt more and more resistant to begin training.

I gave the last 4 years everything I could. I put my life on hold. Track and field was the priority before everything else: my family, my friends, my marriage, my future. This is something I chose to do and I don’t regret it for a second. It made me happy to pursue something I was so passionate about. 

But I’ve done it. I went after what I set out to do and whether I achieved it or fell short is not the point. The point is that I know deep down that I gave it every ounce of energy I had and that if I went back and did it all over again, I would not change a thing; I could not have done anything better. Isn’t this the point of sport? Isn’t this the point of challenging yourself to something? To do the best you can do?

I no longer have the passion for track and field or the heptathlon that I used to because I know I can’t advance any further in the sport; I’ve given it all I can, and I refuse to come back and half-ass it because I love and respect this event and sport too much. With that, I’ve decided to retire. It’s time to move on to my next passion, the next thing in the world I hope to make an impact in.

The list of people that have been a part of my career is large, and I’ve been fortunate enough to thank a lot of them personally. But here are my last parting thank you’s:

To the people who have had a daily part in making my athletic career a success. I couldn’t have done it without you. 

To the University of Oregon and all my coaches there, for believing in me and giving me a magical place to develop my talent.

To my main sponsors and Athletics Canada who have stuck with me day in and day out through this 4 year cycle. You had a large part in me reaching the podium.

To my country, province, and hometown. For allowing me the opportunity to represent you on the world stage. 

To my Canadian teammates and track friends. For your constant encouragement, companionship and distraction when it was needed most. I will miss being on teams with you and cheering you on in the stadium.

To my family for their endless support. Although the last 4 years have been exciting, I know they were also stressful on you. 

To my competitors. Thank you for pushing me and making me the best athlete I could be. You ladies are what I will miss most about the sport. 

And last but not least, to my husband who I know I wouldn’t have been able to do this without.

Ashton

 

I think it was in the summer of 2001. If that’s correct, I was in 7th grade, 13 years old. I remember waking up with nothing to do and going to the dining room table. There were newspapers laying there which I normally don’t care for, but the front page of one caught my eye. I wish I could remember the name of the newspaper; I think the title of the article was something like “Galactic Olympics” or “Interstellar Olympics.” On the front page was a picture of Earth surrounded by athletes from various sports. But there was one athlete with a larger image in the center, in front of Earth. It was a man I didn’t know doing something that looked familiar. I looked at the small caption next to the image “Roman Sebrle throwing the javelin.” That’s right, “javelin.” But who was Roman Sebrle? The article pondered who should represent Earth if there were to be an interstellar Olympic Games. The consensus was: Roman. I considered myself knowledgeable about sports. But out of all the athletes in the world we were choosing this man I had never seen doing something I’d never heard of; the decathlon. I left to go about my day and forgot about that experience until five years later when I heard that word again; "decathlon." This time, I was being asked if I’d consider trying it. I said “sure.” 

 

It has been 10 years since then (secretly I find that fitting) and it’s my time to depart from athletics; to do something new. Frankly there isn’t much more I want to do in sport. I gave the most physically robust years of my life to the discovery and pursuit of my limits in this domain. Did I reach them? Truthfully I'm not sure anyone really does. It seems like we tend to run out of time or will before we run out of potential. That makes humanity limitless then, as far as I'm concerned. And I think that's inspiring.

To my supporters and sponsors; The things I have achieved were achieved together with you. At times when I was doubtful, you believed. And if I was confident, it was also because you believed. Thank you for the love and support.

To anyone I’ve competed with; To compete with you, learn from you, be challenged by you, and to be friends with you, are some of my most protected memories and experiences. Because of you it has been my pleasure to be an athlete.

To USA & Oregon; My birthplace Portland, my roots in La Pine and Bend, and the University of Oregon. I am a product of this environment. Thank you for fostering possibility.

To every coach I’ve had in sport; I know each of you well. Day by day, lesson by lesson, you helped me ascend. Thank you.

To Roman; Thank you for surpassing the limit. Because of you we now aim for higher heights. You will always be the inspiring first.

To Nikola Tesla and Elon Musk; you were my inspirations. From you I learned what it means to work, that ambition overrides adversity, and how to pursue a higher purpose.

To my friends and family; I love you and thank you for always being there, regardless.

To my mom; thank you for believing I could be superman.

 

To Brianne; I’ve never seen such a high level of strength sustained for so long. I love you. What now??

 


Media

Paul Doyle - paul@doylemanagement.com

Meet The Eatons

We are Ashton and Brianne. We are a married couple from two different countries. We are total tech and reality TV junkies. We are small-town grower-uppers, adventure seekers and nutritious eaters. We are world travelers and competition dabblers. We are hard-workers and play-harders; dreamers, achievers, avid readers and coffee-needers. We are athletes. We are people. This is who we are. 

Ashton.Bio.1

Ashton

Ashton grew up in a small, mostly dirt-filled town in Oregon named La Pine. Later he moved to a slightly bigger town named Bend. It was in these places that he learned about hard work and how to use his imagination. He also discovered he loved movement. 

Read More >

 

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Brianne

Brianne was an ultra-competitive young girl growing up in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada. Her parents—not knowing what to do with her—enrolled Brianne in every sport they could think of. She thrived on the adrenaline of competition and being the best at everything she did. 

Read More >


WHAT WE (*used to*) DO

Track and field has three event categories: running, jumping, and throwing. Each of these categories has many event types. For example, 100m sprint, high jump, or hammer throw. Usually an athlete specializes in one event type, like the high jump, maximizing their output in that area. But, there are two events in track and field unlike all the others. They combine events from all three categories: they are the heptathlon and decathlon. That's what we do.


Track and field has three event categories: running, jumping, and throwing. Each of these categories has many event types. For example, 100m sprint, high jump, or hammer throw. Usually an athlete specializes in one event type, like the high jump, maximizing their output in that area. But, there are two events in track and field unlike all the others. They combine events from all three categories: they are the heptathlon and decathlon.

That's what we do.
1

100 METER HURDLES

Being the first event of seven, athletes are nervous and anxious to start the two-day competition. The hurdles are a test of speed and skill. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks for 100 meters, running over 10 barriers that are 33 inches (2.75ft) high.


Brianne's Best: 12.98 sec.
Worth: 1127 points

2

HIGH JUMP

After the hurdles, athletes are energized, more relaxed, and into the rhythm of competition. The high jump is about being smooth and rhythmical in the approach while being dynamic at take off. An athlete chooses their starting height. The bar is raised in 3cm increments. Once an athlete fails three times at a height, they are finished with the high jump competition and given credit for the previous height they cleared.


Brianne's Best: 1.89m (6'2”)
Worth: 1093 points

3

SHOT PUT

The first two events are explosive, powerful, and demanding on your legs. In this event athletes must ask their legs for the same things again, now with extra weight. The women's “shot” is a 4kg (8.8lb.) steel ball. Lower body strength and overall technique are the key to this event. In the heptathlon, each athlete gets three throws.


Brianne's Best: 13.79m
Worth: 780 points

4

200 M

By the time we get to the 200m, the fourth and final event of day one, athletes are thoroughly fatigued, as it's been a long day of competition (sometimes up to 10 hours). The 200m requires athletes to use speed and endurance to sprint halfway around the track.


Brianne's Best: 23.34 sec.
Worth: 1045 points

5

LONG JUMP

The second day of competition is what makes a heptathlete. When athletes arrive on the morning of day two, they are usually sore and achy from the previous day. Operating on little sleep, the women ask their bodies to be dynamic again. The long jump is about gradually picking up speed down the runway and transferring that speed through the take-off board, in the air, and into a sand pit. Each athlete gets three attempts.


Brianne's Best: 6.72m
Worth: 1079 points

6

JAVELIN

Leading into the javelin, athletes begin to see the light at the end of the competition. The javelin is so light it's weighed in grams (600g), so it's hard to not try and throw it as hard as you can with your arm. Like the high jump and long jump, it's about a smooth, rhythmical approach down the runway and, as with shot put, using your lower body to throw the javelin. An athlete gets three attempts.


Brianne's Best: 46.43m
Worth: 791 points

7

800 M

By this point, every heptathlete just wants to be done. Their bodies are tired and sore. The 800 meters is the event that has been sitting in the back of each athlete's mind for two days, causing knots in their stomachs. They start the two-lap run from a standing position, and the race is all about endurance and guts.


Brianne's Best: 2:09.02 sec.
Worth: 979 points

BRIANNE'S BEST TOTAL SCORE
6808
DAY 1 EVENTS
DAY 2 EVENTS
  • 1100 M

    Because this is the first event of ten, athletes are nervous and anxious to start the two-day competition. The 100m race is a test of maximum physical speed. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks and cover the distance as fast as they can.

    Ashton's Best: 10.21 sec
    Worth: 1044 points

  • 2LONG JUMP

    After the nerves have settled down from sprinting on the track, athletes head to the field. The long jump is about gradually picking up speed down the runway and transferring that speed through the take-off, in the air, and into a sand pit. Each athlete gets three attempts.

    Ashton's Best: 8.23m
    Worth: 1120 points

  • 3SHOT PUT

    The first two events are explosive, powerful, and demanding on your legs. Athletes in this event must ask their bodies for the same things again, now with extra weight. The men's “shot” is a 7.25kg (16lb) steel ball. Lower body power and overall technique are the key to doing well in this event. Each athlete gets three throws.

    Ashton's Best: 15.00m
    Worth: 790 points

  • 4HIGH JUMP

    As fatigue starts to set in, athletes now move to one of the longest events of the competition. The high jump is about being smooth and rhythmical in the approach while being dynamic at take off. An athlete chooses their starting height. The bar is raised in 3cm increments. Once an athlete fails three times at a height, they are finished with the high jump competition and given credit for the previous height they cleared.

    Ashton's Best: 2.10m (6'10.7'')
    Worth: 896 points

  • 5400 M

    By the time we get to the 400m, the final event of day one, athletes are thoroughly fatigued, as it's been a long day of competition (sometimes up to 12 hours). Athletes complete the one lap as fast as they can—an exhausting test of speed endurance.

    Ashton's Best: 46.02 sec
    Worth: 1007 points

  • 6110 Meter Hurdles

    The second day of competition is what makes a decathlete. When athletes arrive on the morning of day two, they are usually sore and achy from the previous day. Operating on little sleep, the men ask their bodies to be dynamic again. The hurdles are a test of speed and skill. Athletes sprint out of starting blocks for 110 meters, running over 10 barriers that are 42 inches (3.5 feet) high.

    Ashton's Best: 13.52 sec
    Worth: 1037 points

  • 7DISCUS

    Having woken up from the starting gun of the hurdles, athletes move to the field again. Lighter than the shot put, the 2.2kg (4.85lbs) disc is like a steel pancake. Decathletes have to battle fatigued legs while spinning in a ring and releasing the spinning disc into the sector. Each athlete gets three throws.

    Ashton's Best: 46.17m
    Worth: 791 points

SCORING

The events in the heptathlon and decathlon are always contested in the same order. Events are scored according to a time or distance—not placement; an athlete can get 3rd in one event and 2nd in another and still be the leader overall. Each event has a set point amount for every time or distance. The points are displayed in the “heptathlon/decathlon scoring table.” At the end of the competition the scores are added together for an overall score, which determines the winner of the heptathlon and decathlon.

Daily Life


 

Elite living

 

A new Finish Line

We're deciding what to do next. Whatever it is, you can be certain we will pursue it with the same passion.